Kashidakari

Kashidakari is the Persian name for needlework. Derived from this name, the Kashida, also known as Kasida, is one of the oldest forms of embroidery... Read More

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Kashidakari Embrodery Masterclass

Kashidakari Embroidery Masterclass (On Demand, Pre-Recorded, Self-Paced)

Samjhau Devi

Immerse yourself in the world of Kashidakari embroidery with Samjhu Devi from Mithrau village, Rajasthan. Learn the origins, basic stitches, motifs and a complete pattern in Kashihakari

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₹999.00
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₹999.00
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₹1,999.00
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Learn Kashidakari Artwork
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₹1,750.00
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₹1,750.00
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Kashidakari Kit for Kashidakari Masterclass-
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₹1,350.00
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₹1,350.00
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FAQs

Kashidakari is the most famous embroidery of the Kashmir valley. The term ‘kashidakari’ literally means ‘needle work’.The term Kashidakari is used as an umbrella term which covers all the different types of embroideries.
The craft has been around us for centuries, being passed on from generation to generation, but there is no known specimen earlier than 1800 CE.
The motifs are inspired from their geographical surroundings and what the artists saw around them. They are inspired from the birds such as parrots, woodpeckers and kingfishers; the floral motifs are inspired from lotus, lily, saffron flower, iris and tulips. The other designs include grapes, plums, almonds and cherries. An important motif in the Kashmir region is the chinar leaf.
The motifs are inspired from their geographical surroundings and what the artists saw around them. They are inspired from the birds such as parrots, woodpeckers and kingfishers; the floral motifs are inspired from lotus, lily, saffron flower, iris and tulips. The other designs include grapes, plums, almonds and cherries. An important motif in the Kashmir region is the chinar leaf.
It uses many different embroidery techniques such as crewel or ari work, rezkar, tilla, sozni and dori work. Sozni embroider uses fly stitch, stem stitch and darning stitches. The ari embroidery uses aari to fill in the motifs with chain stitch. It uses stitches such as chain stitches or zalakdodozi, open work or doria work, buttonhole stitch or vatachik and gold work or talibar. The embroidery is used for phirans or the woolen kurtas and namdahs or the woolen rugs and stoles.
It uses many different embroidery techniques such as crewel or ari work, rezkar, tilla, sozni and dori work. Sozni embroider uses fly stitch, stem stitch and darning stitches. The ari embroidery uses aari to fill in the motifs with chain stitch. It uses stitches such as chain stitches or zalakdodozi, open work or doria work, buttonhole stitch or vatachik and gold work or talibar. The embroidery is used for phirans or the woolen kurtas and namdahs or the woolen rugs and stoles.
It is done using a single thread on fabrics such as silk, wool or cotton using thick threads. The colours used are safed (white), zingari (green), uda (purple), firozi (blue) and gulnar (crimson).

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