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Kutch Embroidery

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Shop Daily Life Patch Work in Kutch Embroidery by Kala Raksha

Daily Life Patch Work in Kutch Embroidery by Kala Raksha

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47 in X 32 in

Artist - Kala Raksha blue-tick
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Buy  Kutch Embroidery Cushion Cover
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About Kutch Embroidery

Kutch embroidery, also known as Kutchi Bharat or Kachchhi embroidery, is a traditional form of needlework that originates from the Kutch region of Gujarat, India. It has achieved global appreciation for its intricate beauty and cultural significance. They are often inspired by nature, mythology, and everyday life in the Kutch region. The common motifs found in Kutch embroidery include peacocks, elephants, flowers, and geometric patterns, each imbued with symbolic meaning and cultural significance.

History

The history of Kutch embroidery can be traced back to the 16th century when various communities from different parts of the world, including the Middle East and Central Asia, migrated to the Kutch region. This influx of diverse cultures, each with its distinct textile traditions and embroidery techniques, gradually combined to form a unique craft, later called Kutch embroidery.

Technique and Details

Kutch embroidery is characterized by its intricate stitches, bold motifs, and extensive use of mirrors, beads, and sequins. The embroidery is typically done on fabrics such as cotton, silk, and wool, using a variety of stitches including chain stitch, satin stitch, and herringbone stitch. One of the most distinctive features of Kutch embroidery is the use of mirrors, which are meticulously stitched onto the fabric to create stunning designs. Kutch embroidery is a handicraft that demands time and patience, as sometimes artisans work even for a month into a single piece, reflecting their dedication to their indigenous craft.

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