Phulkari

2 products

  • Featured
  • Best selling
  • Alphabetically, A-Z
  • Alphabetically, Z-A
  • Price, low to high
  • Price, high to low
  • Date, old to new
  • Date, new to old
Regular
Rs. 2,250.00
Sale
Rs. 2,250.00
Regular
Unit Price
per 
Phulkari Artwork
Regular
Rs. 2,750.00
Sale
Rs. 2,750.00
Regular
Unit Price
per 

FAQs

Phulkari is an umbrella term used for the various patterns and traditions it involves. It literally means ‘floral work’.
The origin of traditional phulkari has not been traced yet, though the references go back to the Vedic ages. Anotherr belief is that it was introduced in Kashmir by the Persians. However, the Kashmiri embroidery as we see it today, is different from that of Punjab and Haryana. Phulkari in its present form is the accumulation of the evolution of the embroidery tradition during the reign of Maharaja Ranjit Singh in the 15th century.
The phulkari’s have intricate compositions with pleasing and harmonious colours. The designs are geometric and stylised. Most of the motifs are inspired by life existing around the artists, and so are their names. Such as karela bagh, mirchi bagh, chandrama bagh, kakri bagh, dhania bagh, mor bagh, tota bagh, etc.
The different phulkari’s can be divided as follows: Thirma – Embroidered on a white base, it was worn by the older women and the widows. Chope – It was gifted by the maternal grandmother on her granddaughter’s last bath before her wedding. Suber – Similar to Chope, it was gifted to the bride by her maternal grandmother, to be worn during her phera. Varida bagh – It was gifted by either the mother-in-law, or the grandmother of the groom to the bride when she entered her new household. It is done on a red background with yellow silk thread in small lozenges. Dasharn dwar – It was donated to religious places upon the fulfilment of a wish. Sainchi – It represents the rural life in the villages of Punjab. These were used for daily wear. Til Patra – It was gifted to the domestic servants on the auspicious occasions, such as marriages.
Phulkari is worked entirely from the back in geometric, floral or figural motifs. A combination of these is called phulkari chaddar or a woman’s veil cloth. It is exchanged as a gift during weddings or heirloom.
The Phulkaris are brightly coloured, and the most often used shades are yellow, gold, red, orange, cerise, deep blue and white. The motifs are a geometric nuance as the embroidery is done over counted threads of fabric. This is done in such a fashion that even the empty spaces emerge as motifs or the outlines.

MEDIA COVERAGE