Krishna and Radha with Gopis: Kalighat style by Manoranjan Chitrakar

This subtle yet beautiful painting depicts a scene from Lord Krishna's life where he's playing his flute with Radha beside him and Gopis admiring from the back. The artist has used only the shades of black and yellow in the painting.

Kalighat Pata -The Patuas who migrated to Kolkata in the 18th and 19th centuries observed a society in the throes of colonial rule. The artists began to portray the rising ‘Babu culture’ among Anglophiles in the form of ‘Babu Pata’ and the cruelty and callousness of colonisers in the form of ‘Sahib Pata

The Bengal Pattachitra is a visual and oral art tradition practised by the Patuas or Chitrakars of West Bengal. Islamic by faith, Patua artists represent a unique and secular art tradition. They earn their livelihood by telling stories from Hindu Mythology, local folklores, Sufi tradition and contemporary themes through paintings and songs. Though the origin of the Patua tradition has been difficult to trace for art historians, some claim the oral form goes back all the way to the 10th or 11th century CE. The physical evidence of a scroll, however, only makes an appearance in the 18th century CE. 

Manoranjan aka Manu Chitrakar, has been painting for 30 years since the age of 15. He loves to depict social issues in his works. Manuji has travelled all across India and to Sweden and Paris as well.v In West Bengal, the word chitrakar refers to patachitra painters. We have taken Chitrakar as our last name for hundreds of years.”

DETAILS

  • Size: 28"×22" inches
  • Price is for unframed painting and painting would be sent without a frame
  • Handpainted in Kalighat Bengal Pattachitra style on paper
  • The image shown here is representative to help visualise the painting in a home setting and not an actual framed image
  • COD cannot be accepted as a payment option for paintings
  • This painting will be made to order and will take 3-4 weeks
  • Certificate of Authentication will be provided
  • Please write to us at yosha.gupta@memeraki.com for any customisation in size or ping us on the website chat

• The image shown here is representative to help visualize the painting in a home setting. Price specified is for unframed painting and the painting would be sent without a frame unless specified otherwise in the description.
• All paintings are mostly made to order and take 2-3 weeks
• COD cannot be accepted as a payment option for paintings
• Certificate of Authentication will be provided
• Please write to us at yosha.gupta@memeraki.com for any customisation in size or ping us on the website chat


Artist


Manoranjan Chitrakar

Manoranjan aka Manu Chitrakar, has been painting for 30 years since the age of 15. He loves to depict social issues in his works. Manuji has travelled all across India and to Sweden and Paris as well.v In West Bengal, the word chitrakar refers to patachitra painters. We have taken Chitrakar as our last name for hundreds of years"

The Bengal Pattachitra is a visual and oral art tradition practised by the Patuas or Chitrakars of West Bengal. Islamic by faith, Patua artists represent a unique and secular art tradition. They earn their livelihood by telling stories from Hindu Mythology, local folklores, Sufi tradition and contemporary themes through paintings and songs. Though the origin of the Patua tradition has been difficult to trace for art historians, some claim the oral form goes back all the way to the 10th or 11th century CE. The physical evidence of a scroll, however, only makes an appearance in the 18th century CE. 



Art Form

Kalighat

The Kalighat paintings developed in the 19th century in the Bengal presidency. The travelling scroll painters or the patuas had been practising folk art of Pattachitra. The new manners and customs of the British settlers, the revivalist exercises of the Mughal and theatres as well as the use of Sanskrit on stage was absorbed by the rural artists who had migrated to Calcutta and developed it into a popular urban genre. The period of Kalighat paintings coincides with the age of mechanical reproduction in the form of woodcut, lithography, oleography and printing. These developments had caused mass consumption of imagery in the urban cities and Kalighat was a response to it. The Kalighat painters interacted with the colonial paintings and began the use of water colours, shaded figures, folio-sized mill made papers. They absorbed the role of the western theatre performances and the art schools which developed the unique stylistic features of the Kalighat paintings as we know them today. More here on our blog.



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