Tree of Life: PHAD PAINTING BY KRITIKA JOSHI

Even though the phad paintings were traditionally based on folk stories, the recent radical urbanisation has brought the other elements in the art. Tree of life is one of the most important motifs in any folk art. Here we can see a lush tree which is sheltering the elephants. A herd of elephants in the front are depicted in swift movement. Perhaps they are on their journey to the tree where the other elephants are resting as well.

Kritika Joshi, belongs to the illustrious Joshi family, who started Phad Painting Art 700 years ago. She is the 30th generation in her family after her father Kalyan Joshi who has carried forward this art and has been practicing this art for 12 years already. Creating new ways to take Phad art to the world is her dream.

Phad Painting or Phad is a style religious scroll painting and folk painting, practiced in Rajasthan state of India. This style of painting is traditionally done on a long piece of cloth or canvas, known as phad. The narratives of the folk deities of Rajasthan, mostly of Pabuji and Devnarayan are depicted on the phads.

DETAILS

  • Size: 10 inches by 10 inches
  • Price is for unframed painting and painting would be sent without a frame.
  • Handpainted in Phad art by Artist Kritika Joshi
  • Painted with Natural colours made by the artist.
  • Handpainted on handmade paper.
  • The image shown here is representative to help visualize the painting in a home setting and not an actual framed image
  • COD cannot be accepted as a payment option for paintings
  • This painting will be made to order and will take 3-4 weeks
  • Certificate of Authentication will be provided
  • Please write to us at yosha.gupta@memeraki.com for any customisation in size or ping us on the website chat

• The image shown here is representative to help visualize the painting in a home setting. Price specified is for unframed painting and the painting would be sent without a frame unless specified otherwise in the description.
• All paintings are mostly made to order and take 2-3 weeks
• COD cannot be accepted as a payment option for paintings
• Certificate of Authentication will be provided
• Please write to us at yosha.gupta@memeraki.com for any customisation in size or ping us on the website chat


Artist


Kritika Joshi

Kritika belongs to the illustrious Joshi family, the primary proponents of Phad painting since 700 years and is the 30th generation in her family pursuing this art. A graduate of Indian Institute of Crafts and Design, she has worked with private and non-profits to conduct workshops and exhibitions of Phad painting and related textiles, including Craft Village (Delhi), Amity University and Chitrashala in Bhilwara.

 



Art Form

Phad

 

The Phad painting tradition is widely prevalent in the western state of Rajasthan. It is a folk heritage which is part of both the tangible and intangible aspects of our heritage. Traditionally, the Phad paintings were religious and seldom done commercially. However, today we see its commercialization as it is not possible for the artists to survive solely on the basis of commissions from religious Phad. There has been no literary record of the development or even the mention of Phad in the court traditions of the provincial courts of Rajasthan. This is because these paintings were not made for artistic purposes but were religious in nature.

Phad paintings are the most complex and elaborate of the pictorial devices used for story telling in India. They were traditionally used as movie scrolls, with special emphasis on each scene. They narrated the stories of local folk deities such as Pabuji, Devnarayan, Ramdev pir, Dharamraj, etc. These local heroes are different from each other, but are worshipped because of the similar reason that they have all protected their cattle.

The history of Phad paintings date back to 700 years and are of pure indian subcontinental origin. The chitera, or the professional Phad painters developed the art form in the district of Pur, near Bhilwara, Rajasthan. The traditional painters migrated to Shahpura in the 16th century and then to the city of Bhilwara in the 19th century.

Find more about this Living Temple Heritage of Bhilwara here 



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