Ananthashayanam Kerala Mural Painting by Adarsh

Ananthashayanam, is one of the many names of Lord Vishnu, known to be the creator. The spiritual meaning of the Ananthasayanam encodes many universal mysteries. The word 'Anantha' means the infinite, it is a symbolic representation of the energy of the universe.

The traditional mural paintings of Kerala are a fine art of skill and creative excellence. Most of the noted mural works of Kerala were done between the 15th and 19th centuries. They bear a stamp of uniqueness in techniques used and aesthetics. An ideal souvenir to be treasured for a lifetime, Kerala murals are a symbol of natural beauty and grace, elegance and simplicity and of pious devotion.

Adarsh has learnt Kerala Mural painting at Guruvayur from 2003 to 2008. He has been involved in a lot of conservation work with the government and UNESCO for the conservation of Kerala Murals across Kerala.

DETAILS

  • Size: 194 cm * 92cm
  • Price is for unframed painting and painting would be sent without a frame.
  • Handpainted in Kerala Mural style on canvas.
  • Painted with Acrylic colours by the artist.
  • Handpainted on handmade paper.
  • The image shown here is representative to help visualize the painting in a home setting and not an actual framed image.
  • Please note that as all the artworks are made to order, while the artists will attempt to create the artwork as close to the original artwork as possible but as with all things handmade there maybe some differences in colour and rendition which truly renders each painting as one of a kind.
  • Paintings that are sold out can be made to order in 2-3 weeks
  • COD cannot be accepted as a payment option for paintings
  • Certificate of Authentication will be provided
  • Please write to us at yosha.gupta@memeraki.com for any customisation in size or ping us on the website chat

• The image shown here is representative to help visualize the painting in a home setting. Price specified is for unframed painting and the painting would be sent without a frame unless specified otherwise in the description.
• All paintings are mostly made to order and take 2-3 weeks
• COD cannot be accepted as a payment option for paintings
• Certificate of Authentication will be provided
• Please write to us at yosha.gupta@memeraki.com for any customisation in size or ping us on the website chat


Artist


Adarsh

Adarsh has learnt Kerala Mural painting at Guruvayur from 2003 to 2008. He has been involved in a lot of conservation work with the government and UNESCO for the conservation of Kerala Murals across Kerala.

The traditional mural paintings of Kerala are a fine art of skill and creative excellence. Most of the noted mural works of Kerala were done between the 15th and 19th centuries. They bear a stamp of uniqueness in techniques used and aesthetics. An ideal souvenir to be treasured for a lifetime, Kerala murals are a symbol of natural beauty and grace, elegance and simplicity and of pious devotion.



Art Form

Kerala-mural

The earliest of Kerala murals adorn the walls of the Thirunandhikara Cave Temple in present day Tamil Nadu. Most of the noted mural works of Kerala were done between the 15th and 19th centuries and some even dating back to the 8th century. The murals of Kerala evolved through the significant influences of ancient Dravidian rituals like Kalamezhuthu and Patayani. The oldest of the murals found in Kerala are those in the Thirunandikkara Cave temple now a part of Kanyakumari district in the neighbouring State of Tamil Nadu. The largest mural panel in Kerala called the Gajendra Moksha is at the Krishnapuram Palace near Kayamkulam in Alappuzha district. Extensive murals depicting scenes from the Hindu epics, the Ramayana and the Bhagavatha are preserved at the Mattancherry Palace in Ernakulam district. The murals of the Shiva Temple at Ettumanoor provide insights into the earliest forms of Dravidian mural art. 

Traditional murals used panchavarana (Sanskrit: five colours) exclusively i.e. red, yellow, green, black and white,[white being the colour of the wall itself. Colours are prepared from vegetable and mineral pigments. Red is derived from red laterite, yellow is derived from yellow laterite, white from lime, and black from oil-lamp soot. Leaves of Neelamari plant are squeezed and the extract is used after drying up to be mixed with Eravikkara for obtaining the green pigment. Wooden utensils are used for mixing the colours and the binding medium used is derived from tender coconut water and extracts from the Neem tree  The characters in the murals are coloured according to their characteristics as illustrated in the relevant Hindu mythological scriptures. Spiritual, divine and dharmic characters (satwika) are depicted in shades of green. Those influenced towards power & materialistic wealth (rajasic) are painted in shades of red to golden yellow. Evil, wicked and mean characters (tamasic) are generally painted in white or black.



MEDIA COVERAGE