THE GODDESS: BENGAL PATTACHITRA PAINTING BY MANORANJAN CHITRAKAR

Artist : Manoranjan Chitrakar
Size : Medium
Dimensions : H:1.2(ft) by W: 0.5(ft) | H: 14.5(in) by W: 6(in)
Medium : Natural Colors on Paper

About the Artwork+
Authentication+
Sizes and Customisation+
International Shipping and Taxes+
Shipping and Returns +
Colour Disclaimer +

Artist


Manoranjan Chitrakar

"In West Bengal, the word chitrakar refers to patachitra painters. We have taken Chitrakar as our last name for hundreds of years" says Manoranjan aka Manu Chitrakar, who has been painting for 30 years since the age of 15. He enjoys depicting societal themes in his works. Manuji has travelled across India, as well as to Sweden and Paris. The Bengal Pattachitra is a visual and oral art tradition practised by West Bengal's Patuas or Chitrakars. Patua painters, who are Muslim by faith, represent a distinct and secular art history. They make a living by painting and singing stories from Hindu mythology, local folklore, Sufi tradition, and modern issues. Though the origins of the Patua tradition have been difficult for art historians to trace, some suggest the oral form dates back to the 10th or 11th century CE. The physical evidence of a scroll, on the other hand, does not occur until the 18th century CE.

 



Art Form

Bengal-pattachitra

The Bengal Pattachitra is a visual and oral art tradition practised by the Patuas or Chitrakars of West Bengal. Islamic by faith, Patua artists represent a unique and secular art tradition. They earn their livelihood by telling stories from Hindu Mythology, local folklores, Sufi tradition and contemporary themes through paintings and songs. Though the origin of the Patua tradition has been difficult to trace for art historians, some claim the oral form goes back all the way to the 10th or 11th century CE. The physical evidence of a scroll, however, only makes an appearance in the 18th century CE. 



MEDIA COVERAGE